Case Study Questions Chapter 1 Power Sharing

What is Case Study Question / Paragraph Based Question?
A case study is a scenario in a particular academic / professional context which students are expected to analyse and respond to, guided by specific questions posed concerning the situation. In many cases, the scenario or case study involves a number of issues or problems that must be dealt with in a academic / professional workplace.

Why Case Study Questions are included in academics?
Case study assignments usually require students to identify problems and issues in a scenario, to demonstrate their developing knowledge of theories and academic / professional policies and to make decisions and recommendations based on these to either prevent or solve some of the issues in that scenario.

How to solve Case Study Questions?
There are several steps to writing an answer to a case study assignment:

STEP 1: Read the case study and questions carefully.

  • Read the case and associated questions carefully.
  • Highlight the main points of the case and any issues that you can identify.
  • Read the questions closely and analyse what they are requiring you to do.
  • Read the case again, linking the information that is relevant to each question you have been asked.

STEP 2: Identify the issues in the case study.
Case studies describe a situation which may arise in a particular profession or social context. They often involve a number of people in a complex situation. They will often describe a situation which is problematic, possibly in how it is dealt with, or in its complexity. An important part of your answer is to analyse the situation and to identify the issues/actions described in the case which may be problematic. The following questions may help you to do this:

  • What actions were taken in the case?
  • Were these actions the most appropriate and why?
  • Were there any consequences of the actions taken?
  • Was anything omitted or not considered?
  • Were actions/procedures in line with existing codes of practice, policy or theories?

STEP 3: Link theory to practice.
Use your knowledge of existing codes of practice, theories and/or other academic / professional documents and behaviours to decide what was done appropriately and what was not.

STEP 4: Plan your answer.
It can be useful to use the questions you have been set as headings and to answer each part in turn, reducing the chance of omitting set questions. You can always take out the headings before you submit if you wish. Lecturers usually set questions in a logical order, so answer in the order they are written in your question.

STEP 5: Start writing your case study answer (for theory only)
Like any assignment, you will need an introduction, body sections in which you answer the questions put to you regarding the case study, and a conclusion.

STEP 6: Edit and proofread.
Read through your paper yourself to detect and correct other errors and omissions.
Check you have answered all questions and backed up your answer with relevant passage.

Types of Case Study Questions / Paragraph Based Questions
Case Study Questions / Paragraph Based Questions can be broadly classified into two types:

  1. MCQs type: In this type, student has to tick the correct option from various options.
  2. Theory type: In this type, student has to write proper solution / answer in cotext to the case study.

Case Study/ Passage Based Questions Chapter 1 Power Sharing

Type 1: MCQ type

Case Study Question 01

Read the extract given below and answer the questions that follows:

Power can be shared among governments at different level – a general government for the entire country and governments at the provincial or regional level. Such a general government for the entire country is usually called federal government. In India, we refer to it as the Central or Union Government. The governments at the provincial or regional level are called by different names in different countries. In India, we call them State governments. This system is not followed in all countries. There are many countries where there are no provincial or state governments. But in those countries like ours, where there are different levels of governments, the constitution clearly lays down the power of different levels of government. The same principle can be extended to level of government lower than the state governments, such as the municipality and panchayat. Let us call division of powers involving higher and lower levels of government vertical division of power.

Answer the following MCQs by choosing the most appropriate option:

Question.1. Which form of power sharing is most commonly referred to as federalism?

(a) Horizontal division of power
(b) Vertical division of power
(c) Division of power among various communities
(d) Sharing of power among political parties

Question.2. In India the government at the provincial level is known as ________.

(a) State Government
(b) Provincial government
(c) Federal government
(d) None of the above

Question.3. Choose the odd one out from the following:

(a) Federal government
(b) State Government
(c) Panchayats
(d) Union List

Question.4. Which one of the following option is the lowest level of power sharing in India?

(a) Country
(b) State
(c) Panchayat
(d) None of these

Ans.1. (b) Vertical division of power.
Ans.2. (a) State Government
Ans.3. (d) Union List
Ans.4. (c) Panchayat

Type 2: Theory Type

Case Study Question 02

Read the sources given below and answer the questions that follows:

Source A- Majoritarianism in Sri Lanka
Sri Lanka emerged as an independent country in 1948. The leaders of the Sinhala community sought to secure dominance over government by virtue of their majority. As a result, the democratically elected government adopted a series of MAJORITARIAN measures to establish Sinhala supremacy. In 1956, an Act was passed to recognise Sinhala as the only official language, thus disregarding Tamil.

Source B- Ethnic Communities of Sri Lanka
The Sri Lankan Tamils launched parties and struggles for the recognition of Tamil as an official language, for regional autonomyand equality of opportunity in securing education and jobs. But their demand for more autonomy to provinces populated by the Tamils was repeatedly denied. By 1980s several political organisations were formed demanding an independent Tamil Eelam (state) in northern and eastern parts of Sri Lanka.

Source C- Accommodation in Belgium
The Belgian leaders took a different path. They recognised the existence of regional differences and cultural diversities. Between 1970 and 1993, they amended their constitution four times so as to work out an arrangement that would enable everyone to live together within the same country. The arrangement they worked out is different from any other country and is very innovative.

Source A- Majoritarianism in Sri Lanka
Question.1. Which act recognises the Sinhala as the only official language?

Source B- Ethnic Communities of Sri Lanka
Question.2. Who launched parties and struggles for the recognition of Tamil as an official language?

Source C- Accommodation in Belgium
Question.3. How many time Belgium amended their constitution?

Ans.1. The act of 1956 AD in Sri Lanka recognises the Sinhala as the only official language.
Ans.2. The Sri Lankan Tamils launched parties and struggles for the recognition of Tamil as an official language, for regional autonomy and equality of opportunity in securing education and jobs.
Ans.3. Belgium amended their constitution four times.

Case Study Question 03

Read the extract and answer the questions that follows:

The two different sets of reasons can be given in favour of power sharing. Firstly, power sharing is good because it helps to reducethe possibility of conflict between social groups. Since social conflict often leads to violence and political instability, power sharing is a good way to ensure the stability of political order. Imposing the will of majority community over others may look like an attractive option in the short run, but in the long run it undermines the unity of the nation. Tyranny of the majority is not just oppressive for the minority; it often brings ruin to the majority as well. There is a second, deeper reason why power sharing is good for democracies.

Power sharing is the very spirit of democracy. A democratic rule involves sharing power with those affected by its exercise, and who have to live with its effects. People have a right to be consulted on how they are to be governed. A legitimate government is one where citizens, through participation, acquire a stake in the system. The idea of power-sharing has emerged in opposition to the notions of undivided political power. For a long time it was believed that all power of a government must reside in one person or group of persons located at one place. It was felt that if the power to decide is dispersed, it would not be possible to take quick decisions and to enforce them. But these notions have changed with the emergence of democracy. One basic principle of democracy is that people are the source of all political power. In a democracy, people rule themselves through institutions of self-government. In a good democratic government, due respect is given to diverse groups and views that exist in a society.

Question.1. How does people rule themselves in a democracy? Why power sharing is good?

Question.2. Write one of the basic principle of democracy?

Ans.1. In a democracy, people rule themselves through institutions of self-government. Power sharing is good because it reduces the conflicts between the social groups.
Ans.2.
(i). One basic principle of democracy is that people are the source of all political power.
(ii). People rule themselves through institutions of self government.

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